Help
Home

Richard D. McBride II


 

Richard D. McBride II                  

Associate Professor

Mailing Address:
Department of History #1970
55-520 Kulanui Street
Laie, HI 96762
USA

Telephone: (808) 675-3593
Email: richard.mcbride@byuh.edu

Areas of Professional Study and Interest

Courses

  • HIST 201 - World Civilizations To 1500
  • HIST 309 - Medieval Europe
  • HIST 342 - Traditional Asia
  • HIST 390R - Korean Civilization
  • HIST 490 - Historical Research and Writing
  • IDS 317 - Religion and Culture
  • GE 110 - Critical Thinking

Education

  • PhD, University of California - Los Angeles, 2001
  • B.A., Asian Studies, Brigham Young University, 1993
  • B.A., Korean Studies, Brigham Young University, 1993

Teaching Experience

  • Associate Professor, History, Brigham Young University-Hawai‘i, 2014-
  • Assistant Professor, History, Brigham Young University-Hawaii, 2008
  • Fulbright Senior Researcher, Korea, 2007-2008
  • Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in Korean Studies and Buddhist Studies, Washington University in St. Louis, 2004-2007
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, Pomona College, 2003-2004
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Chinese Religions, University of Iowa, 2002-2003
  • Visiting Faculty, University of California, Irvine, 2001-2002
  • Visiting Faculty, UCLA, 2001

Selected Publications

Books

  • Hwaŏm I:  The Mainstream Tradition (translator, annotator, and editor), Collected Works of Korean Buddhism, Volume 4.  Seoul:  Tae-Han Pulgyo Chogyejong [Chogye Order of Korean Buddhism], 2012.
  • Hwaŏm II:  Selected Works (translator, annotator, and editor), Collected Works of Korean Buddhism, Volume 5.  Seoul:  Tae-Han Pulgyo Chogyejong [Chogye Order of Korean Buddhism], 2012.
  • State and Society in Middle and Late Silla (editor).  Early Korea Project Monograph Series no. 1.  Cambridge, Mass.:  Early Korea Project, Korea Institute, Harvard University, 2010 [2011].
  • Domesticating the Dharma: Buddhist Cults and the Hwaŏm Synthesis in Silla Korea. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2008.

Articles

  • “Enchanting Monks and Efficacious Spells: Rhetoric and the Role of Dhāraṇī in Medieval Sinitic Buddhism.” Pulgyo hakpo 佛敎學報 (Seoul) 72 (September 2015): 167–200.
  • “Buddhism in Korea.” In Oxford Bibliographies in Buddhism, http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195393521/obo-9780195393521-0213.xml (accessed 29-Oct-2015).
  • “Wŏnhyo’s Pure Land Thought on Buddhānusmṛti in its Sinitic Buddhist Context.” Acta Koreana (Taegu) 18, no. 1 (June 2015): 45–95.
  • “Koryŏ Buddhist Paintings and the Cult of Amitābha: Visions of a Hwaŏm-inspired Pure Land.” Journal of Korean Religions 6, no. 1 (April 2015): 93–130.
  • “Guest Editor’s Introduction.” Journal of Korean Religions 6, no. 1 (April 2015) [Special Issue on Korean Pure Land Buddhism]: 5–11.
  • “Koguryŏ Pulgyo ŭi ŭirye wa suhaeng e kwanhan koch’al” 高句麗 佛敎의 儀禮와 修行에 관한 考察 (A study on the rituals and practices of Koguryŏ Buddhism). In Han’guk kodaesa yŏn’gu ŭi sigak kwa pangbŏp: No T’aedon kyosu chongnyŏn kinyŏm nonch’ong 1 한국 고대사 연구의 시각과 방법: 노태돈 교수 정년기념논총 1 (Point of View and Method in Research on Korean History: Festschrift in Commemoration of the Retirement of Prof. Noh Tae Don, vol. 1), comp. No T’aedon Kyosu Chŏngnyŏn Kinyŏm Nonch’ong Kanhaeng Wiwŏnhoe (Committee for the Publication of the Festschrift in Commemoration of the Retirement of Prof. Noh Tae Don), 643–669. P’aju: Sagyejŏl, 2014.
  • “Imagining Ritual and Cultic Practice in Koguryŏ Buddhism.” International Journal of Korean History (Seoul) 19, no. 2 (September 2014): 1–43.
  • “Uicheon and Monastic Education and Curriculum in Early Goryeo.” In The State, Religion, and Thinkers in Korean Buddhism, by Robert M. Gimello, Ko Seung-hak, Richard D. McBride II, Robert E. Buswell Jr., Hwansoo Ilmee Kim, and Kim Yong-tae, 61–125. Seoul: Dongguk University Press, 2014.
  • “The Structure and Sources of the Biography of Kim Yusin.” Acta Koreana (Taegu) 16, no. 2 (December 2013): 497–535.
  • “Guo zhen you ‘Misheng’ fojiao ma?” 果真有“密乘”佛教吗? (Is there really “Esoteric” Buddhism?). In He wei mijiao: guan yu mijiao de dingyi, xiuxi, fuhao he lishi de quanshi yu zhenglun 何谓密教?: 关于密教的定义、修习、符号和历史的诠释与争论 (Eng.: What is Tantrism: the interpretation and controversy of the definition, practice, semiology, and historiography of Tantrism), ed. Chen Weirong 沈卫荣, 143–167. Trans. Liang Jue 梁珏. Beijing: Zhongguo zangxue chubanshe, 2013.
  • “Pŏmhae’s Hagiography of Wŏnhyo from the Late Chosŏn Period.” International Journal of Buddhist Thought and Culture (Seoul) 20 (February 2013): 59–73.
  • “Selections from the Commentary on the Three Maitreya Scriptures (Sam Mireukgyeong so (seon)) by Gyeongheung: Annotated Translation and Introduction.” In Doctrinal Treatises: Selected Works, Collected Works of Korean Buddhism, Volume 6, edited by A. Charles Muller, 201–294. Seoul: Dae-Han Bulgyo Jogyejong [Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism], 2012.
  • “Watch Yourself! (Jagyeongmun), by Yaun Gag-u: Annotated Translation and Introduction.” In Doctrinal Treatises: Selected Works, Collected Works of Korean Buddhism, Volume 6, edited by A. Charles Muller, 397–422. Seoul: Dae-Han Bulgyo Jogyejong [Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism], 2012.
  • “The Inscriptions on the Standing Maitreya and Amitābha Images of Kamsan Monastery and Devotional Buddhism of the Mid-Silla Period.” Kojŏnhak yŏn’gu [Korean Journal of Classical Studies] (Seoul) 1 (December 2011): 125–159.
  • “Buddhist Devotional Practice in Silla Korea.” In Sangwŏl Wŏn’gak Taejosa t’ansin 100 chunyŏn kinyŏm Purhak nonch’ong 上月圓覺大祖師 탄신 100주년 기념 佛學論叢 [Festschrift on Buddhist Studies in Commemoration of the Hundred-year Anniversary of the Birth of the Great Patriarch Sangwŏl Taegak], ed. Taehan Pulgyo Ch’ŏnt’aejong Ch’ongmuwŏn Wŏn’gak Pulgyo Sasang Yŏn’guwŏn, 2:739–771. Seoul: Taehan Pulgyo Ch’ŏnt’aejong Ch’ulp’anbu, 2011.
  • “When Did the Rulers of Silla Become Kings?” Han’guk kodaesa tam’gu 韓國古代史探究 [Sogang Journal of Early Korean History] (Seoul) 8 (August 2011): 215–255.
  • “Practical Buddhist Thaumaturgy: The Great Dhāraṇī on Immaculately Pure Light in Medieval Sinitic Buddhism.” Journal of Korean Religions (Seoul) 2, no. 1 (March 2011): 33–73.
  • “Esoteric Buddhism and its Relation to Healing and Demonology.” In Esoteric Buddhism and the Tantras in East Asia: A Handbook for Scholars, ed. Charles D. Orzech, Henrik H. Sørensen, and Richard K. Payne, 208–214. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2010.
  • “Popular Esoteric Buddhist Deities and the Spread of their Cults.” In Esoteric Buddhism and the Tantras in East Asia: A Handbook for Scholars, ed. Charles D. Orzech, Henrik H. Sørensen, and Richard K. Payne, 215–219. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2010.
  • “Esoteric Buddhist Scriptures in the Context of Chinese Buddhist Translation Practice.” In Esoteric Buddhism and the Tantras in East Asia: A Handbook for Scholars, ed. Charles D. Orzech, Henrik H. Sørensen, and Richard K. Payne, 220–222. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2010.
  • “The Development of the Esoteric Buddhist Canon.” In Esoteric Buddhism and the Tantras in East Asia: A Handbook for Scholars, ed. Charles D. Orzech, Henrik H. Sørensen, and Richard K. Payne, 304–306. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2010.
  • “The Impact of Translated Esoteric Buddhist Scriptures on Chinese Buddhism.” In Esoteric Buddhism and the Tantras in East Asia: A Handbook for Scholars, ed. Charles D. Orzech, Henrik H. Sørensen, and Richard K. Payne, 307–314. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2010.
  • “Silla Buddhism and the Hwarang.” Korean Studies 34 (2010): 54–89.
  • “Silla Pulgyo wa Hwarangdo” 新羅佛敎와 花郞徒 (Silla Buddhism and the Hwarang). In Sŏngmun Yi Kidong kyosu chongnyŏn kinyŏm nonch’ong: Han’guk kodaesa yŏn’gu ŭi hyŏndan’gye 石門 李基東敎授 終年紀念論叢: 한국 고대사연구의 현단계 (Festschrift commemorating the retirement of Sŏngmun Prof.. Lee Kidong: The present level of research on ancient Korea), ed. Sŏngmun Yi Kidong Kyosu Chongnyŏn Kinyŏm Nonch’ong Kanhaeng Wiwŏnhoe石門 李基東敎授 終年紀念論叢刊行委員會 (Committee for the Publication of the Festschrift Commemorating the Retirement of Sŏngmun, Prof. Lee Kidong), 557–593. Seoul: Churyusŏng Ch’ulp’ansa, 2009.
  • “Pak Ch’anghwa and the Hwarang segi Manuscripts.” Journal of Korean Studies 13, no. 1 (Fall 2008): 57–88.
  • “Silla Buddhism and the Hwarang segi Manuscripts.” Tongguk sahak 東國史學 (Seoul) 44 (June 2008): 35–71.
  • “The Mysteries of Body, Speech, and Mind: The Three Esoterica (sanmi) in Medieval Sinitic Buddhism.” Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 29, no. 2 (2006) [2008]: 305–355. “Pak Ch’anghwa and the Hwarang segi Manuscripts.” Journal of Korean Studies 13 (forthcoming fall 2008).
  • “The Mysteries of Body, Speech, and Mind: The Three Esoterica (sanmi) in Medieval Sinitic Buddhism.” Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 29, no. 2 (2006 [forthcoming 2008]).
  • “Silla Buddhism and the Hwarang segi Manuscripts.” Korean Studies 31 (2007): 19-38.
  • “Preserving the Lore of Korean Antiquity: An Introduction to Native and Local Sources in Iryŏn’s Samguk yusa.” Acta Koreana (Taegu) 10, no. 2 (July 2007): 1-38.
  • “A Miraculous Tale of Buddhist Practice in Unified Silla.” In Religions of Korea in Practice, ed. Robert E. Buswell, Jr., 65-75. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007.
  • “Yi Kyubo’s Lay of the Old Shaman.” In Religions of Korea in Practice, ed. Robert E. Buswell, Jr., 233-243. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007.
  • “Is the Samguk yusa Reliable? Case Studies from Chinese and Korean Sources.” Journal of Korean Studies 11, no. 1 (Fall 2006): 163-189.
  • “What is the Ancient Korean Religion?” Acta Koreana (Taegu) 9, no. 2 (July 2006): 1-30.
  • “A Koreanist’s Musings on the Chinese Yishi Genre.” Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies (Seoul) 6, no. 1 (April 2006): 31-59.
  • “The Study of Korean Buddhism in North America: Retrospective and Recent Trends.” The Review of Korean Studies (Seoul) 9, no. 1 (March 2006): 27-48.
  • “The Hwarang segi Manuscripts: An In-Progress Colonial Period Fiction.” Korea Journal (Seoul) 45, no. 3 (Autumn 2005): 230-260.
  • “Dhāraṇī and Spells in Medieval Sinitic Buddhism.” Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 28, no. 1 (2005): 85-114.
  • “Why did Kungye claim to be the Buddha Maitreya? The Maitreya Cult and Royal Power in the Silla-Koryŏ Transition.” Journal of Inner and East Asian Studies (Seoul) 2, no. 1 (2004): 37-62.
  • “Is there really ‘Esoteric’ Buddhism?” Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 27, no. 2 (2004): 329-356.
  • “The Vision-Quest Motif in Narrative Literature on the Buddhist Traditions of Silla.” Korean Studies 27 (2003): 16-47.
  • “Hidden Agendas in the Life Writings of Kim Yusin.” Acta Koreana (Taegu) 1 (August 1998): 101-142.

 

Biographical Sketch

Richard McBride, was raised in Los Angeles, California, and enjoys reading, hiking, and visiting historical sites, particularly in East Asia. In 2001, he earned a Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures at UCLA where he became a specialist in Korean and Chinese Buddhism and early Korean history. He is one of very few in the country that can read both ancient Chinese and Korean Buddhist texts. For the academic year 2007-2008, Prof. McBride was a Fulbright senior researcher in Korea, studying early Korean history. He particularly enjoys immersing himself in ancient writings, uncovering a world markedly different from his own, and working with scholars from around the world to decipher the past.  Prof. McBride’s family includes his wife Younghee and sons David and Sean who attend Laie Elementary School.  The McBrides have been fortunate to visit Korea nearly every summer since 2010.